VATICAN CITY

Association of Saints Peter and Paul 50th Anniversary

Release Date:  25 May 2021

 

  

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

Issue Date: 25 May 2021
Designer: Liam Hipple
Sheet Composition: 10 stamps
Stamp Size: 40 x 48 mm; sheet size: 224 x 120 mm
Printing Method: Offset lithography 4 colors
Perforation: 13 x 13¼
Printer: Cartor, France
Quantity: 34,000 stamps

Sheet of 10 Stamps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Association of St. Peter and Paul, established in 1971 by the will of Saint Paul VI in order to collect the legacy of ideals of the Palatine Guard of Honor of His Holiness, dissolved by the will of the same pontiff a year earlier together with the other papal military bodies. The members are Catholics of Rome who wish to “bear a particular witness of Christian life, apostolate and fidelity to the Apostolic See” (as stated in Art. 1of the Statute of the new Association) through cultural activities, works of Christian charity and the service carried out mainly in the Papal Basilica of St. Peter in the Vatican and on the occasion of papal liturgical celebrations.

The motto “Fide constamus avita” (We persevere firmly in the fidelity of our fathers), inherited from the Palatine Guard, expresses the purpose of always being united in fidelity to the supreme pontiff and dedication to his service, inspired by the noble example of those who preceded them.

The anniversary stamp, designed by the very young British artist Liam Hipple, frames the final portion of St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican, where most of the association’s activities and service are concentrated, with Bernini’s canopy in the foreground, and the apse wall in the background. The illustration is completed by the coat of arms of the Association depicting the two Holy Apostles, chosen by Paul VI on the basis of a gilded votive glass dating back to the second half of the 4th century, currently preserved at the Vatican Museums.

 

 

 

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