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France

04 September 2020

Council of Europe

Human Rights Palace 1995-2020

France, Council of Europe: Human Rights Palace 25th Anniversary, 4 September 2020. Images from Phil-Ouet

Technical Specifications:

Issue Date: Friday, September 4, 2020
Illustrated obliteration 1st day in Strasbourg (67) Council of Europe, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Avenue de
L’Europe, 67000 STRASBOURG (Subject and only on Friday 4 September) in Paris (75) Le Carré d’Encre, from 10am to 5pm, 13 bis rue des Mathurins, 75009 PARIS. (No obliteration)
General sale on Monday, September 7, 2020 Info
Face value: €1.40 See fares as of September 7, 2020
Notice of receipt of the recommended letter for international
Postage of priority letter up to 20g internationally
Vertical stamp – Serration : 13
Total dimensions: 30×40.85 mm
Colors : white on blue background
Digitally printed at 42 stamps per sheet
Issued to 300,000 copies
Featured by Valérie Besser
based on a graphic design by Ivan HARBOUR

The 25th Anniversary of the Palace of Human Rights

The European Court of Human Rights is now easily identified around the world by its logo, which takes the form of the Palace of Human Rights in which it sits in Strasbourg. This building, whose symbolic form illustrates and represents justice, was designed by the British architect Richard Rogers, who is also co-author of the Pompidou Centre in Paris.

Made of metal covered with aluminum, glass and concrete, the building stands majestically along the water. The choice of materials is also symbolic: aluminum is like armour, a guarantee of independence and neutrality; Glass represents transparency and accessibility of justice; concrete shows that there are no frills and that in these places, we go to the essentials.

A strong and emblematic architectural work, the Palace of Human Rights, in which the ECHR has been based since 1995, was awarded the “Remarkable Contemporary Architecture” label in 2015.

Lord Richard Rogers was awarded the Pritzker Prize in 2007 as the “Nobel of Architecture”.

© – La Poste – Council of Europe – All rights reserved
According to Phil@Poste’s press release

European Convention on Human Rights 70th Anniversary

France – Council of Europe: European Convention on Human Rights 70th Anniversary, 4 September 2020. Images from Phil-Ouest.

Technical Specifications:

Issue Date: Friday, September 4, 2020
Illustrated obliteration 1st day in Strasbourg (67) Council of Europe, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Avenue de
L’Europe, 67000 STRASBOURG (Subject and only on Friday 4 September) in Paris (75) Le Carré d’Encre, from 10am to 5pm, 13 bis rue des Mathurins, 75009 PARIS. (No obliteration)
General sale on Monday, September 7, 2020 Info
Face value: €1.40 See fares as of September 7, 2020
Notice of receipt of the recommended letter for international
Postage of priority letter up to 20g internationally
Stamp – Serration : 13
Total dimensions: 30×40.85 mm
Colors : overseas blue and yellow on a bleu_vert background
Digitally printed at 42 stamps per sheet
Issued to 300,000 copies
Featured by Valérie Besser
based on a graphic design by Ivan HARBOUR

The European Convention on Human Rights is 70 years old A Convention to protect your rights and freedoms
The European Convention on Human Rights was signed in Rome, Italy, on 4 November 1950 by 12 Council of Europe member states and came into force on 3 September 1953.

It guarantees, among other things, the right to a fair trial, freedom of expression, freedom of thought, conscience and religion. It prohibits, among other things, torture, slavery and forced labour, discrimination.

It was the first treaty to establish a supranational court, the European Court of Human Rights, in 1959 to ensure compliance with the commitments of States Parties. By agreeing to be condemned by a supranational court, sovereign states have de facto recognized that human rights take precedence over national laws and practices.

Its ratification is an indispensable condition for joining the Council of Europe.

Council of Europe member states guarantee fundamental, civil and political rights, not only to their nationals, but also to all persons under their jurisdiction

© – La Poste – Council of Europe – All rights reserved
According to Phil@Poste’s press release

The Council of Europe (Conseil de l’Europe) is an international organization whose stated aim is to uphold human rights, democracy and the rule of law in Europe.[4] Founded in 1949, it has 47 member states, with a population of approximately 820 million, and operates with an annual budget of approximately 500 million euros.

The organization is distinct from the 27-nation European Union (EU), although it is sometimes confused with it, partly because the EU has adopted the original European Flag which was created by the Council of Europe in 1955, as well as the European Anthem. No country has ever joined the EU without first belonging to the Council of Europe. The Council of Europe is an official United Nations Observer.

The Council of Europe cannot make binding laws, but it does have the power to enforce select international agreements reached by European states on various topics. The best known body of the Council of Europe is the European Court of Human Rights, which enforces the European Convention on Human Rights.

The Council’s two statutory bodies are the Committee of Ministers, comprising the foreign ministers of each member state, and the Parliamentary Assembly, composed of members of the national parliaments of each member state. The Commissioner for Human Rights is an independent institution within the Council of Europe, mandated to promote awareness of and respect for human rights in the member states. The Secretary General heads the secretariat of the organization. Other major CoE bodies include the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines and the European Audiovisual Observatory.

The headquarters of the Council of Europe are in Strasbourg, France. English and French are its two official languages. The Committee of Ministers, the Parliamentary Assembly, and the Congress of the Council of Europe also use German, Italian, and Russian for some of their work.

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