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01 March 2020

Gastronomy and Sweets (Series 3) – Traditional Popular Snacks

Macau: Gastronomy and Sweets (Series 3) – Traditional Popular Snacks, 1 March 2020. Images from CTT Filatelia.

Technical Specifications:

Issue Quantity: 250,000; CTT Macao Code: S262; UPU/WADP code: MO011.20 – MO14.20
A set of 4 stamps with face value at 2.50, 4.00, 4.50 and 6.00 patacas (MOP)

Stamps per sheet: 16
Paper: Security Paper
Size: 40 x 30 mm
Perforation: 13.49 x 13.28 (With elliptical perforations)
Printing: Offset Lithography with Microprinting
Printer: Sprintpak, Australia
UPU/WADP Code: MO011.20 – MO014.20

Gastronomy and Sweets III – Traditional Popular Snacks

A wide variety of traditional popular snacks have emerged after centuries of evolution. They can both reveal the local customs and reflect the folk wisdoms.

Rice Pudding
Rice Pudding, a kind of Cantonese snack originated from Taishan, has already a history of hundreds of years. As early as the Ming Dynasty, the ancient literati came all the way to look for this snack. According to the Local Chronicle of Taishan County, “Beside the Huafengyu bridge, clear water gushes from the spring among the stones at the bottom of the river …… It can be used to purify the sugar. Steam it in a clay bowl after clarification”. This production method is passed down to today, and the Cantonese Rice Pudding is now popular both nationwide and overseas.

Maltose Crackers
Maltose, also known as “Yi” (malt sugar) in ancient times, is produced through the fermentation of rice, wheat, millet and corn, etc. It has the effects such as moistening the lungs, promoting the secretion of saliva, discharging heat, and treating symptoms of qi deficiency, general malaise, cold and deficiency of spleen and stomach, and dyspnea disorder. Cantonese people like to dip it with coconut shreds for snacks, while Hong Kong and Macao citizens use it to make “sandwiches-like” crackers. And the unique “bartering” feature of the malt sugar, i.e., exchangeable for old and used housewares, makes it very popular with children.

Dragon’s Beard Candy
Dragon’s Beard Candy, made of wheat flour and maltose, is produced by hand-pulling the mixture into threads and then rolling it into crispy candy. This folk snack could date back to two thousand years ago, and according to legend, it was accepted as a snack for the royal family by the Emperor Zhengde of Ming Dynasty. Later, after it was named “Dragon’s Beard Candy” by the Emperor Yongzheng of Qing Dynasty, this folk snack became famous. Among hundreds of producers, the Dragon’s Beard Candy from Anhui Anqing is the best.

Roasted Chestnut
Roasted Chestnut, also known as “Sugar Roasted Chestnuts”, is made through stir-frying chestnuts with quartz sands and sugar. Fangshan, the suburban area of Beijing, is rich in chestnuts. While since Liangxiang was the distribution centre for chestnuts, they are usually called “Liangxiang chestnuts”. As early as two thousand years ago, the chestnuts already got their fame. According to the history, “Dates and chestnuts are abundant in the north and can feed people who even do not need to work in the fields.” According to the Diary of Xi Jin, “In autumn, at the shops and markets of Yanjing City, people stir-fry chestnuts mixed with sugar and gravels.” Those are the roasted chestnuts!

Sugar Painting
Sugar painting is a form of traditional Chinese folk art using melted sugar to create diverse range of patterns. The artwork can be appreciated and eaten. Originated from the Ming Dynasty, this folk art has evolved into the art of sugar painting nowadays. According to the Qing Dynasty novel “Jian Hu Supplement”, based on the customs of the Ming Dynasty, when people were worshipping, sugar was melted to create various birds, animals, and human figures as sacrificed items. The cast characters were usually dignified and distinguished-looking, like civil ministers and military generals. Therefore, they were also called “Sugar Prime Minister.”

Author: Lok Pó
Translation: Boss Translation Company Limited

Press release from Macau Post:

27/02/2020 17:06

STAMP ISSUE “GASTRONOMY AND SWEETS III – TRADITIONAL POPULAR SNACKS”

Macao Post and Telecommunications Bureau issued the stamp themes “Dim Sum” and “Hawker’s Food” under the stamp series of “Gastronomy and Sweets” in 1999 and 2002. The third series with the stamp theme “Gastronomy and Sweets III – Traditional Popular Snacks” will be issued on 1st March, 2020.

A wide variety of traditional popular snacks have emerged after centuries of evolution, they can both reveal the local customs and reflect the folk wisdoms. This issue includes a set of four stamps and one souvenir sheet, illustrated five different snacks, include: “Rice Pudding”, typical of Guangdong province, originated from the city of Taishan, has already a history of hundreds of years; “Maltose Crackers”, Hong Kong and Macao citizens like to use it to make “sandwiches-like” crackers; “Dragon’s Beard Candy”, made of wheat flour and maltose, is produced by hand-pulling the mixture into threads and then rolling it into crispy candy; “Roasted Chestnut”, made through stir-frying chestnuts with quartz sands and sugar; and “Sugar Painting”, made with melted sugar to create diverse range of patterns, can be appreciated and eaten.

The above issue will be available for sale at the General Post Office, from 9:00a.m. to 5:30p.m., and the Communications Museum, from 9:00a.m. to 12:00 noon. The mail service for the relative philatelic products cancelled with the commemorative postmark will be available on the issue date at the above locations. The philatelic products are as follows:

Philatelic Products Selling Price Quantity
Set of 4 Stamps 17.00 patacas 250,000
Sheetlet 68.00 patacas
Souvenir Sheet 14.00 patacas 250,000
First Day Cover with Stamps 23.00 patacas 3,500
First Day Cover with Souvenir Sheet 20.00 patacas 3,500
Information Brochure 7.00 patacas 4,000
Information Brochure with Stamps 24.00 patacas
Information Brochure with Souvenir Sheet 21.00 patacas
Set of 4 Postcards 12.00 patacas 3,000
Set of 4 Maximum Cards 29.00 patacas

The stamp designer of this issue is Ms. Yu Si, and the text of the information brochure is written by Mr. Lok Pó.

This is the third theme of 2020 issues. The previous issued stamps are “Lunar Year of the Rat” on 05/01/2020 and “70th Anniversary of the Macao Federation of Trade Unions” on 20/01/2020.

In order to reduce the influx of people and reduce their concentration, on that day, different service areas will be installed and measures will be taken to access the entrances and control the number of people at the General Post Office. There will also be limitations on the number of correspondence to be sent per philatelist, in order to control the period of stay of each person in the place.

Souvenir Sheet:

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