Correo Argentino

Argentina

January 2020

National Parks Definitive Stamps

 Pre-Delta National Park, Entre Rios (09 January 2020)

Argentina: National Parks Definitive Stamps – Pre-Delta National Park, Entre Rios, 9 January 2020. Image from Colnect.

 Technical Specifications:

Issued on: 2020-01-09
Colors: Multicolor
Perforation: Syncopated13½
Printing: Offset lithography
Paper: Non Flourescent
Denomination: $50 (Argentine peso)

The Predelta National Park (Parque Nacional Predelta) is a national park of Argentina, located in south-west of the province of Entre Ríos, 6 km south from Diamante, in the Argentine Mesopotamia, at the beginning of the Paraná River Delta. The park was created on 13 January 1992 under the Law Nº 24.063, with an area 24.58 square kilometres to protect a sample of the Upper Delta of the Paraná, which belongs to the Paraná Delta and Islands Ecoregion. The Predelta is the area where the sediments of the Paraná start forming islands, while the river itself splits into several major arms and many smaller watercourses.


 Calliegua National Park, Jujuy (13 January 2020)

The design of this stamp has not yet been publicized. PHILATELIC PURSUITS will share the actual artwork for this issue once it becomes available.

Technical Specifications:

Issued on: 2020-01-13
Colors: Multicolor
Perforation: Syncopated13½
Printing: Offset lithography
Paper: Non Flourescent
Face value: $1

The Calilegua National Park (Parque Nacional Calilegua) is a federal protected area in Jujuy Province, Argentina. Established on 19 July 1979, it houses a representative sample of the Southern Andean Yungas biodiversity in good state of conservation. Located at the Ledesma Department on the eastern slopes of the Calilegua hills. and with an area of 76,306 ha (763.06 km²; 294.62 sq mi), it is the largest national park in the Argentine Northwest.

This area was occupied a long time ago by native groups. Their settlements were located in the lower knoll, near the farming grasslands. The archaeological pieces and sites found in the park, such as pottery and polished stone axes, are related to the communities that inhabited the Yungas region. From the 15th century on, this territory was occupied by the Incas. At present, this region is inhabited by Kolla communities.

The park has a beautiful landscape, which you can see when transiting the Provincial Route 83 that runs through it. Along the route, you see three different environments: the jungle foothills, mountain forest and mountain woods, each with their own characteristic vegetation.

It is also possible to see certain species of birds and mammals in particular, which makes this site an ideal place to observe wildlife, especially birds, about 270 species were identified and its estimated that 230 more could inhabit the area, which makes Calilegua the home of 50% of all bird species in the country and a paradise for birdwatching. The park is home to the jaguar, the largest South American predator, along with other cats like the jaguarundi, the ocelot, the puma and the pampas cat. The largest mammal in the Yungas, the tapir, also inhabits the reserve.

Calilegua National Park and nearby towns offer a wide range of activities, with varying degrees of difficulty. The tours relate to ecotourism and active tourism, but the area offers a strong cultural imprint and you may visit several towns where the local contact is a highly valued experience for those interested in ethnic diversity and the discovery of local cultures.


Nahuel Huapi National Park, Rio Negro-Neuquen (13 January 2020)

The design of this stamp has not yet been publicized. PHILATELIC PURSUITS will share the actual artwork for this issue once it becomes available.

Technical Specifications:

Issued on: 2020-01-13
Colors: Multicolor
Perforation: Syncopated 13½
Printing: Offset lithography
Paper: Non Flourescent
Face value: $300

Nahuel Huapi National Park (Parque Nacional Nahuel Huapi) is the oldest national park in Argentina, established in 1934. It surrounds Nahuel Huapi Lake in the foothills of the Patagonian Andes. The largest of the national parks in the region, it has an area of 7,050 km² (2,720 sq mi), or nearly 2 million acres. Its landscapes represent the north Patagonian Andean Zone consisting of three types, namely, the Altoandino (with perpetual snow above an altitude of 1,600 metres (5,200 ft)), the Andino-Patagónico (in the lower reaches of the hills) and the Patagonian steppe. It also represents small parts of the Valdivian Rainforest.

The park and the reserve lie at an altitude of 720–3,574 metres (2,362–11,726 ft), and are designated under IUCN management categories II (National Park) and IV (Management Reserve). The park is completely protected while the reserve is partially protected. The national park is dominated by the high mountain chain of the Andes, many lakes, rapid rivers, waterfalls, snow-clad peaks, glaciers and extensive forests. It is bordered by Chile on its western side.

The earliest discovery of Nahuel Huapi by the non-indigenous peoples is linked to the conquest of Chile. In the summer of 1552–1553, the Governor of Chile Pedro de Valdivia sent Francisco de Villagra to explore the area east of the Andes at the latitudes of the city of Valdivia. Francisco de Villagra crossed the Andes through Mamuil Malal Pass and headed south until reaching Limay River in the vicinity of Nahuel Huapi Lake.

In colonial times explorers in the search for the legendary “Ciudad de Los Cesares” visited the zone and Jesuit missionaries coming from Chiloé Archipelago established a precarious mission on the shores of the lake.

In the 1870s and 1880s Perito Moreno undertook a series of exploration trips into Patagonia. Later he worked for the Argentine government’s boundary commission. In short —Perito Morenos‘ explorations and work were fundamental for securing Argentine sovereignty of the Nahuel Huapi area. As compensation for his services Perito Moreno was granted a huge tract of land around Nahuel Huapi Lake.

In 1903, Perito Moreno donated 75 square kilometres (29 sq mi) of land in the area to the federal government. At the same time he proposed the creation of a national park. A decree of February 1, 1909 recognized that the area needed protection then in 1916 works begun to establish a park and it finally opened in 1922 as Parque Nacional del Sur. The total surface of the incipient national park in 1916 surpassed that of the donations of Perito Moreno. It was not until October 9, 1934 that Nahuel Huapi National Park acquired it present name. At the same time in 1934 the Iguazú National Park was established in Argentina.

In contrast to subtropical Iguazú National Park, however, temperate Nahuel Huapi National Park was believed to be able to compete with the tourism of Europe and was therefore, along with Bariloche, prioritized by national tourism development planners. In the first year of the National Park Service, 1935, several regulations were implemented that affected Nahuel Huapi. These included construction code, sport fishing, standardization of drinking water sanitation, and issuance of vendor permits. The area opened up for mountain climbing and other recreational activities after the park was established.


 Sierra de Las Quijadas National Park, San Luis (16 January 2020)

Argentina: National Park Definitive Stamps – Sierra de Las Quijadas National Park, San Luis, 16 January 2020. Image from Colnect.

Technical Specifications:

Issued on: 2020-01-16
Colors: Multicolor
Perforation: Syncopated13½
Printing: Offset lithography
Paper: Non Flourescent
Face value: $10

The Sierra de las Quijadas National Park (Parque Nacional Sierra de las Quijadas) is a national park located in the northwestern part of the Argentine province of San Luis. It was established on December 10, 1991, to protect the natural features, representative of the Semiarid Chaco and the Argentine Low Monte ecoregions.

Sierra de las Quijadas is located in the San Luis Basin, whose surface is composed of sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous outcrops of various ages. The basin is bounded by the Sierra de San Luis to the east, while to the west the basin is presumed to be subsurficially connected to the Triassic basins of the Mendoza and San Juan provinces. To the north, the basin extends to Marayes de San Juan. It is an anticlinal structure, of roughly elliptical shape whose major axis is oriented meridionally. A large fracture extends in the north-south direction, subparallel to the current course of the Desaguadero River. Along this fracture, the Quijadas range has been lifted.

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