Póstur | Iceland Post Postphil

Iceland

07 May 2020

Equal Voting Rights for all Icelandic Citizens Centenary

Iceland: Equal Voting Rights for all Icelandic Citizens Centenary, 7 May 2020. Images from Iceland Post Postphil.

Technical Specifications:

Issued on: 2020-05-07
Size: 30 x 40 mm
Colors: Multicolor
Perforation: Die cut14x13½
Printing: Offset lithography CMYK
Gum: Self-Adhesive
Denomination: 50g Innanlands (face value ISKr 195 on day of issue)
Designer Oscar Bjarnason
Number per sheet 10
Printer Cartor

695A 100 years of equal voting rights for all Icelandic citizens. 50g domestic (195 ISK)

Iceland is generally considered to be one of the leading countries in the world in regard to the human rights enjoyed by its citizens. Human rights are guaranteed by Sections VI and VII of Iceland’s Constitution. Since 1989, a post of Ombudsman exists. Elections are free and fair, security forces report to civilian authorities, there is no state violence, and human rights groups are allowed to operate without restriction. Religious freedom is guaranteed, and discrimination based on race, gender, disability, language, or other factors is illegal.

The General Committee of the Icelandic Parliament, the Althingi, is responsible for the legislative oversight of human rights.

In a 2012 interview, a member of the UN Human Rights Committee singled out two principal human-rights problems in Iceland: “inequality between women and men…especially in the labour market” and the “sexual abuse of children.”

Iceland elects on a national level a ceremonial head of state, the president – and a legislature. The president is elected for a four-year term by the people. The parliament (Alþingi) has 63 members, elected for a four-year term by proportional representation, using the D’Hondt method with open list. Iceland has a multi-party system, with numerous parties in which no one party typically has a chance of gaining power alone, so parties must work with each other to form coalition governments.

The most recent election was held on 28 October 2017.

Full Sheet of 10 Stamps:

First Day Cover:

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